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Hamradio International Space Station

             Memorable Occasion
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Frequencies
Worldwide downlink for voice and packet 145.80
Worldwide packet uplink 145.99
Region 1 voice uplink 145.20
Region 2 and 3 voice uplink 144.49
Worldwide uplink for cross band voice repeater
437.80
For more information contact ARISS Web site .


Making Contact with ISS

  Working ISS:
  To work ISS from your home, you should have at least the following Amateur Radio
  equipment: A 2-meter radio with an output rating of 25 to 50 watts. An omni-directional
  antenna or small beam. A short run of good quality coax (RG-213, 100 feet or less).
  A standard 1200-baud AX.25 Packet modem (TNC). And that is it for radio equipment.
  I use an inexpensive KPC-3 modem for all of my ISS packet connections and I can
  even hear ISS with my police scanner.

  Timing:
  You will need access to a computer or web to tell you when ISS is in range of your
  station. The timing of your contact is the most important part of a successful contact
  with ISS. There are many tracking programs out in the market place today. The ARISS
  team does not endorse any specific tracking program. Some programs are share-ware
  (STSPLUS); others cost a few bucks. I recommend using the DOS InstantTrack, program
  by AMSAT. www.amsat.org This program is very easy to use and works very well with
  older style computers such as 80286 style PC's. The cost of most tracking software
  applications is approximately $50-100.

  The above info was obtained from ARISS Web site.

  Success Tips for Using the ISS Voice Repeater From ARRL

  AMSAT Online Satellite Pass Predictions

  AMSAT Web site

  Space Shuttle Gallery Images-Video-Audio From 1995 To Today


       From ARRL Headquarters
       Newington, CT  April 20, 2004
       To all radio amateurs

       SB SPACE ARL ARLS006
       ARLS006 Three Radio Amateurs on their Way to the ISS

       Following a successful early-morning launch Monday, April 19 (UTC),
       three Amateur Radio operators are on their way to the International
       Space Station (ISS) in a Russian Soyuz vehicle. ISS Expedition 9
       crew members Gennady Padalka, RN3DT, and Mike Fincke, KE5AIT,
       accompanied by European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Andre Kuipers,
       PI9ISS, of the Netherlands took off into space from Baikonur
       Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The Soyuz is due to dock with the ISS just
       after 0500 UTC on Wednesday, April 21.

       Padalka and Fincke will relieve Expedition 8 crew members Mike
       Foale, KB5UAC, and Sasha Kaleri, U8MIR. During his nine days aboard
       the space outpost, Kuipers will conduct a couple of Amateur Radio on
       the International Space Station (ARISS) school group contacts and
       carry out scientific experiments under a commercial agreement
       between the ESA and Russia. He'll return to Earth April 29 with
       Foale and Kaleri aboard the Soyuz vehicle now attached to the ISS.
       Foale and Kaleri have been on the space station since last October.

       Padalka, 45, will serve as Expedition 9 commander and Soyuz
       commander, while Fincke, 36, will be the NASA ISS science officer
       and flight engineer. They have been training together as a space
       station crew for nearly two years. This marks Fincke's first space
       flight and Padalka's second. Padalka lived aboard the Russian Mir
       space station for 198 days in 1999.

       For more information about Amateur Radio on the ISS and SAREX,
       visit the ARISS Web site.

       

====================================================================



       From ARRL Headquarters
       Newington, CT  October 26, 2000
       To all radio amateurs

       SB SPACE ARL ARLS014
       ARLS014 Coming soon: First ham operation from ISS

       Amateur Radio is poised to mark an historic milestone. Operation
       from Amateur Radio's first permanent foothold in space is expected
       to debut soon after the all-ham Expedition 1 crew arrives November 2
       aboard the International Space Station.

       The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station--or
       ARISS--initial station gear already is aboard the ISS awaiting the
       arrival of Expedition 1 Commander and US astronaut Bill Shepherd,
       KD5GSL, and Russian Cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev, U5MIR, and Yuri
       Gidzenko. The equipment includes VHF and UHF hand-held transceivers
       as well as a TNC for packet, a specially developed headset and
       signal adapter module plus power adapters and interconnecting
       cables.

       The Expedition 1 crew is set to blast off aboard a Russian Soyuz
       rocket October 31 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and
       will arrive aboard the ISS a couple of days later. Once on board,
       the crew will begin a four-month stay aboard the ISS--the first
       permanent occupancy of the international complex.

       Two US call signs have been issued for Amateur Radio operations as
       part of the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
       program. The FCC granted vanity call signs NA1SS and NN1SS to the
       International Space Station Amateur Radio Club on October 11. The
       NA1SS call sign will be used on board the ISS, while NN1SS will be
       for ground-based ISS communications from Goddard Space Flight Center
       in Maryland. A Russian call sign, RZ3DZR, and a German call sign,
       DL0ISS, also have been issued for use aboard the ISS.

       Still to be determined are the frequencies for ARISS and an
       operating schedule. A decision on both is expected soon, along with
       QSL information. The initial station gear will be installed
       temporarily in the Zarya Functional Cargo Block of the ISS and will
       permit operation only on 2 meters--FM voice and packet. The ARISS
       Team anticipates multiband, multimode operations with the crew and
       regularly scheduled school group contacts.

       For more information about Amateur Radio on the ISS and SAREX,
       visit the ARISS Web site.

       

====================================================================



       From ARRL Headquarters
       Newington, CT  November 1, 2000
       To all radio amateurs

       UPDATE

       SB SPACE ARL ARLS015
       ARLS015 All-Ham Crew is ISS-Bound

       The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station--or
       ARISS--initial station gear already is aboard the space station. It
       will be installed temporarily in the Zarya Functional Cargo Block of
       the ISS and will permit operation on 2 meters--FM voice and packet.
       Tentative operating frequencies are: Worldwide downlink for voice
       and packet, 145.80 MHz: worldwide packet uplink, 145.99 MHz; Region
       1 (Europe) voice uplink: 145.20 MHz; Region 2 and 3 voice uplink,
       144.49 MHz.

       Crew members may use their personal call signs or one of the ''club
       station'' call signs issued for ISS use--NA1SS, RZ3DZR, or DL0ISS.

       For ARISS information and updates, visit the,
       ARISS Web site.
       
====================================================================

Click here for more info: International Space Station Reference.
====================================================================
       
Space Station







Memorable Occasion For WA4DNS

w5lfl qsl

w5lfl qsl


STS-9 SPACELAB-1
Launched Nov 28, 1983
Landed at Edwards A.F.B. Dec 8, 1983
Total Amateur Radio operating time was 4hrs 30mins



Audio Recordings from Space Craft Columbia STS-9
      1)  Calling CQ Europe
      2)  Calling CQ North America
      3)  Passing over Florida




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